The Troll in Scots and Shetland Scots






The Troll and the Kist of Gowd
The Troll in Scots
Julia Donaldson
Illustrated by David Roberts
Translated by James Robertson


There wis yince a troll that steyed ablow a brig.
(That’s jist whaur trolls are meant tae stey.)

Meanwhile, awa oot tae sea, there wis some pirates that steyed in a ship.
(And that’s jist whaur pirates are meant tae stey.)

Trolls, they say, are meant tae eat goats, but nae goats cam teeter-totterin ower this troll’s wee brig. Sae he ate fush insteid.

So begins this hilarious tale of the adventures of a bunch of incompetent pirates who can’t cook, and a crabbit auld troll who can. Their lives seem very far apart: the troll, whose favourite dish is goat, tries and fails to eat the creatures crossing various bridges he hides under; the pirates, who like to eat fish, try and fail to find buried treasure. But by a series of coincidences their paths cross – with dramatic consequences!

 








Da Trow
The Troll in Shetland
Julia Donaldson
Illustrated by David Roberts
Translated by Christine de Luca


Dey wir eence a trow at baed anunder a brig.
(Maist trows bide in hadds anunder hills.)

Aboot da sam time, fram apo da far haaf,dey wir some pirates dat baed apon a ship.
(Dat's whaar pirates is meant ta bide.)

Trows is supposed ta aet goats (dey say!) But nae goats ivver cam tipperin owre dis trow's peerie brig. Sae he ot fish instead.


So begins this hilarious tale of the adventures of a bunch of incompetent pirates who can't cook, and a crabbit auld troll (in Shetland, where they live in great abundance, trolls are known as trows) who can. Their lives seem very far apart: the troll, whose favourite dish is goat, tries and fails to eat the creatures crossing various bridges he hides under; the pirates, who like to eat fish, try and fail to find buried treasure.